Masthead header

Kids Money Saving Pack

During the school holidays we realised my youngest needed a new bike, her big sister has nearly outgrown her bike so we handed Miss 9’s bike down to Miss 7.  This meant Miss 9 had to buy herself a new bike (Miss 7 is helping contribute some money).  Unfortunately she didn’t have enough money in her piggy bank so she has borrowed some money from Mummy and Daddy to help purchase the bike.  Miss 9 is now saving her pocket money and earning extra money by doing extra chores around the home.

We are trying to teach our kids about the value of money, how to save and return when you borrow.  We grown up’s get regular bank statements to keep us on track, but our little kidlets keep adding their money to their money boxes and every week or so I find them trying to count it all up.  My kids get a little muddled up with counting money, so I created the ‘Kids Money Saving Pack’ to help my Miss 9 keep track of how much she has borrowed and how much she still owes.

Here is an example on how the pack works:

Miss 9 is usually a wonderful helper already at home, but this chart is seeing her do tasks she normally wouldn’t do, she is thrilled to be helping me and earning some money. I am happy to have somebody else dust the furniture!!   These charts are also great because there are days that I don’t have the money she has earned so this is noted on her chart as an IOU.

Each of the ‘kids money saving packs’ includes:

  • Instructions on how to use the charts
  • 4 charts with different sized boxes, as some kids may only need to save for $10 and others perhaps $100
  • 4 extra pages, as they may save more money than allocated boxes
  • A list of age appropriate chores ideas
  • A list you can add chores your happy for them to do and the $ value you are prepared to pay for each chore.  eg. sweep floor $0.50

I have made these charts available in the shop in a variety of colours.  You can save, print and use the chart as many times as you need.

visit shop to purchase

 Other colours available: 

bottom blog post 20 day challenge
Receive one simple tip each weekday to help you organise, clean & declutter your home
  • Love this idea, Kat! It can be difficult sometimes to teach kids the value of money and I think that when they save the money themselves, their purchase is much more special :)ReplyCancel

  • Jac @ Common Chaos Chronicle

    This couldn’t have come at a better time for us Kat! I am in the process of trying to teach the kids (ahem, and the hubby) how to save for those items that they long for. At the moment, Jai is saving his pocket money up to buy his own iPad. He’s fed up with the others deleting his games. I said I’d match him dollar for dollar but I have no idea what he is up to.
    Thanks so much for this, and a big thanks from The Monster Squad for helping them with a life-long skill. xoxReplyCancel

  • That’s a fantastic idea Kat…especially leading up to Christmas. The kids are so oblivious to what things cost sometimes. Such an important skill to learn. ReplyCancel

  • Trish

    A great idea Katrina. It is great for math skills too.ReplyCancel

  • This is a wonderful idea especially in the lead up to Christmas! Teaching our kids good money habits is a MUST!! Thank you Katrina! ReplyCancel

  • Hfrankie

    I am just starting to think about introducing pocket money for my oldest, but not sure if she’s too young. What does everyone think is a good age to introduce pocket money?ReplyCancel

  • Katrina, Thank you. Going to purchase this now. Miss 4.5 has been asking Santa for an iPad for Christmas. There is no way Santa can afford this so Hubby and I have decided she can get an iPad Mini however she has to contribute to it and we will match her $ for $ for every $ she earns doing chores for pocket money! This will make it so much more tangible for her. THANK YOUReplyCancel

    • That is such a great idea, I have heard so many other parents doing the same, matching $ for $ for chores, helps the kids to learn about earning and responsibility!ReplyCancel

Your email is never published or shared. Required fields are marked *

*

*